Milwaukee Brewers Suter Joins the Players for the Planet Team

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We as a society need to have a monumental reconnection in our relationship with nature in order to move towards a sustainable future. When, not if, this takes place, sustainable policies and lifestyles will organically come to pass and we will once again inhabit a planet that thrives, is stable, and abundantly provides for all life.


Brent Suter was born in Chicago, Illinois and was raised in Cincinnati, Ohio. He continues to call Cincinnati his home in the offseasons. He was drafted in the 31st round by the Milwaukee Brewers out of Harvard University after graduating with a degree in Environmental Science and Public Policy. He made his Major League debut in 2016 with the Brewers, with whom he remains as a pitcher.

Suter first found his environmental passion during his freshman hear of high school after viewing An Inconvenient Truth. The urgency of the documentary struck a nerve in Brent and he’s been trying to live conscious of his environmental impacts ever since and encourages others to do the same. He has been involved with the Urban Ecology Center and Eco-City Milwaukee in the Milwaukee area and authored a climate change article that was published in Fast Company in October 2018.

Composting, eating organic food, investing in renewable energy, eating less meat, planting native flowers/trees and minimizing single-use plastics are Suter’s focuses in living a planet-friendly life.

P4P Welcomes former New York Yankee Slade Heathcott

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We have all been given one home, this beautiful planet called Earth where plants grow lush and green, deserts span thousands of miles, and enormous oceans divide continents. In a world were everyone is connected, it is time for us to stand up together, to fight and preserve this beautiful place we call home. We might all have unique backgrounds, upbringings, and interests but we all share ONE common need....this beautiful rock we live on. If we don’t start preserving and respecting mother nature soon, there will not be an Earth to save. There will not just be plastic littering every beach and highway but there will eventually be destruction beyond that which can sustain human life.

Slade Heathcott was born in Sulpher, Louisiana. Heathcott was raised in Pryor, Oklahoma and then moved to Texarkana, Texas to start high school. He was was drafted in the first round in 2009 out of high school by the New York Yankees and debuing in the 2015 season after 6 seasons and 6 surgeries. In 2011 Heathcott started private pilot aviation courses and then in 2014 started taking one class at a time and sometimes two classes to slowly begin his Bachelors in Aeronautics.

In the 2015 off season his love of being outside in nature began to really grow in the form of hiking, backpacking, and camping. The views from his hammock of untouched forests or scaling mountains began to shape and change his perspective - over time this bred the realization that we need to starting taking better care of this beautiful rock we all live on.

During the 2017 season, Heathcott did a research paper on E-waste and the effects it has had on the world and the countries unfortunate enough to receive this equipment. This equipment is rarely working most of the time despite what exporters who are illegally discarding this material say. All this E-waste is then burned in huge electronic grave yards, normally in villages or communities with men, women, and children just yards away from it all. Children and adults alike walk through this charred and burning rubble to search for precious metals and valuable objects that they can clean and sale for a very small earning compared to the overall well being of these villages, countries, and even the world. These massive electronics dumps where the equipment is burned, releases dangerously harmful toxin into the air that is being breathed in by young children and people of the community.

“ We have all been only been given one home, this beautiful planet called Earth where plants grown lush and green, deserts span thousands of miles, and enormous oceans divide continents. In a world that every one is connected, it is time for us to stand up together; to fight and preserve this beautiful place we call home. We might all have unique backgrounds, upbringings, and interests but we all share ONE common need....this beautiful rock we live on. If we don’t start preserving and respecting mother nature soon, there will not be an Earth to save. There will not just be plastic littering every beach and highway but there will eventually be destruction beyond that of which can sustain human life.”

Why Ocean Cleanup is Critical

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As Players for the Planet gets ready to launch our ocean clean-up campaign in Santo Domingo in partnership with Parley, we wanted to further look into the effects of ocean trash and see how it directly impacts us as individuals. While we often see images of marine animals being directly harmed by our large pieces of anthropogenic (def: caused by humans) debris, we often fail to think about our pollution at a much smaller level. Some of our smaller pieces of trash, like fibers from clothing or pieces of tiny plastic end up in the intestinal tracts of fish and in the shells of marine mollusks and therefore, can end up in our GI tracts. Studies have shown that small anthropogenic debris can lead to cellular necrosis, inflammation and lacerations to our intestinal tissue. We took a look at a 2015 study that investigated the likelihood that you would find plastic or fibers in fish and shellfish that were being sold at markets for human consumption. Other studies in the past looked exclusively at wild caught fish but this study focused specifically on fish we eat, species that included salmon, bass, sanddabs and herring.


Paotere Fish Market in Indonesia:

  • 21 / 76 (28%) of individual fish investigated had anthropogenic debris in their GI tract

  • 6 / 11 (55%) of species investigated had anthropogenic debris in their GI tract

  • Species included mackerel, shortfin scad, and herring

  • Some fish had up to 21 pieces of debris!

  • Every piece of debris was plastic!


Half Moon Bay & Princeton in California:

  • 16 / 64 (25%) of individual fish investigated had anthropogenic debris in their GI tract

  • 8 / 12 (67%) of species investigated had anthropogenic debris in their GI tract

  • Species included rockfish, salmon and striped bass

  • 4 / 12 (25%) Pacific oysters investigated had anthropogenic debris in them

  • Majority of the debris were visible fibers!


The study did not draw a conclusion as to why the debris in Indonesia was comprised of exclusively plastic while the majority of the debris in the seafood found in California were fibers. The scientists speculated that it could be due to how each country manages their waste. While Indonesia ranks extremely poorly in anthropogenic waste management at 2nd worst in the world, the US fares only slightly better at 20th.


Now, before you say, “eh, I’ll take my chances with the 25% that there’s some human pollutant in my seafood”, keep in mind this is a very conservative study. This study only counted pieces of debris that exceeded 0.5mm. For reference, the width of your fingernail is 1 mm and you can see your roommate’s clippings sitting on the coffee table with your naked eye all too easily right now! These small pieces of debris often start as big pieces and we hope that you will help us in our cleanup effort before more of this pollution finds its way into our food!


Players for the Planet Welcomes Cincinnati Reds pitcher Zack Weiss

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With all of the pressing environmental issues facing the world today, it is more important than ever that humans begin to truly understand the impact that their daily activities have on the planet. I am extremely excited to join Players for the Planet and help baseball be on the forefront of making societal changes for the betterment of our environment. Actions we take today can have a lasting positive or negative effect on future generations and I am happy to be on a team that prioritizes leaving the world better than we found it.

Zack Weiss is a Southern California native who was born and raised in Irvine, California. After graduating from Northwood High School, Weiss attended UCLA where he played baseball and was a member of the 2013 National Championship team. Since 2013, Weiss has been a pitcher in the Cincinnati Reds organization, reaching the Major Leagues for the first time in 2018. A Geography and Environmental Studies major with a minor in Geographic Information Systems, Weiss has had a passion for environmental science and how to to best take scientific data and present it to individuals who can make better informed decisions in their daily lives. 

Players for the Planet featured in Good Magazine

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"We are collaborating with Players For The Planet and META Collective to bring sustainable infastructure to Las Matas. We have a lot of needs but because I live there I know exactly what we need. One of the things I first started doing was trying to find a fire truck because we didn’t have one there. In 2012, I started looking around, trying to buy one. I even looked online, and the price was too high. Back then, I was talking to the Texas Rangers’ foundation, and they found a guy who owned fire trucks. We made contact with them, and then I was also able to find two ambulances. I gave one to San Francisco de Macoris and one to my hometown. Everything really started with that, but I always do stuff in the community."

For full article click here.

7th Annual Players for the Planet E-Waste Recycling Drive

The Seventh Annual PNC/Players for the Planet E-Waste Recycling Drive was a BIG success.  We, with YOUR help, collected 175,543 pounds of E-Waste during the three day event in May.  This brings the total E-Waste collected over the past seven years to 1,140,817 pounds....or....570 plus TONS!!  What an accomplishment....what a huge success story for the people of Cincinnati and the surrounding townships!!

 Here are the final results.

  • Thursday, May 5, 2016  Northgate: 493 cars (6% growth year to year) 45,263 pounds
  • Friday, May 6, 2016  Anderson Towne Ship: 663 cars (19% growth year to year) 60,871 pounds
  • Saturday, May 7, 2016  Hyde Park: 756 cars (8% growth year to year) 69,409 pound

The three day results:

  • 1,912 cars participated in the event.....amazing turnout when you think of how cold it was on Thursday!
  • 175,543 pounds unloaded and recycled properly
  • During the three day E-Waste Drive we averaged 58,514 pounds collected daily (49,472 in 2015)
  • 1,140,817 pounds of E-Waste has been collected in Cincinnati over the past seven years and saved from going to landfill.

And, what we believe to be one of the more impressive stats, we had 142 Volunteers from local Cincinnati businesses assist us in unloading the 175,543 pounds from the 1,912 cars over the three day period.....thank you!

For more information on the 2016 recycling drive and photos (Thank you Brewster Rhodes and Michael Anderson), please visit the Cohen USA website: http://www.cohenusa.com/reds

Thank you to all of our sponsors (PNC Bank, Cohen USA, Kroger, CBTS, Rumpke, Macy's and Duke Energy), to the Cincinnati Reds, to the staff of Cohen USA, to Hamilton County Recycling & Solid Waste, City Of Cincinnati Office of Environment & Sustainability & Green Umbrella and to Jay Bruce, Marty Brennaman and George Foster....we would not be enjoying this success without your help!

It has been a pleasure, again, to work with all of you and we look forward to working with you on the Eight Annual E-Waste Recycling Drive in 2017!